Governor releases nearly $1.3 billion public works plan

Gov. Tim Walz unveiled a $1.27 billion bonding proposal this week. The package of capital improvements includes $350 million for transportation, $300 million for projects at the University of Minnesota and Minnesota State, and $150 million for housing. You can read the full list of proposed projects here.
 
While various CGMC priorities receive funding in the proposal — including the Greater Minnesota Business Development Public Infrastructure (BDPI) Grant Program, wastewater infrastructure programs, and grants to local governments for road and bridge improvements — many of the proposals fall short of what is needed to address the various infrastructure challenges in Greater Minnesota.
 
The Governor proposed $67 million for Public Facilities Authority (PFA) programs: $40 million for the Water Infrastructure Fund, $22 million for Point Source Implementation Grants, and $5 million for the Clean Water and Drinking Water Revolving Funds. In making this proposal, the Governor has assumed that the $59 million in PFA funding which was included in last year’s bonding bill but is currently tied up in a lawsuit will be resolved before this bill moves forward. The CGMC is advocating for legislation that would provide $128 million in funding for the PFA water programs. If the Legislature is able to resolve the dispute over the money that is being held up from last year’s bonding bill, then the Governor’s PFA proposal is only $2 million less than the CGMC’s request.
 
The Governor’s bonding proposal of $3 million for BDPI would likely not be enough to fund the program through FY2021 due to the program’s popularity and high demand for the funds. In order to ensure cities can continue to access this successful program, the CGMC is seeking $20 million in BDPI funding.
 
Gov. Walz’s bonding plan also includes $100 million each for the Local Bridge Replacement Program and the Local Road Improvement Program. While this funding could help cities in Greater Minnesota address critical transportation infrastructure needs, these two programs have often been used to earmark projects in the metro area, leaving little for communities outside the Twin Cities.
 
Following the release of the Governor’s bonding proposal, Senate Capital Investment Committee Chair Dave Senjem (R-Rochester), who has not held a committee meeting this session, said if the Senate were to pursue a bonding bill at all, it would be closer to the $265 million amount included in the state’s November budget forecast. In the House, Speaker Melissa Hortman (DFL-Brooklyn Park) commented that she would prefer a $3 billion bonding bill, but will put a proposal together closer to half that.